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Posts tagged "Executors & Fiduciaries"

Choosing the right executors ensure last wishes are fulfilled

Choosing the right person to look after the handling of assets is a large part of successful estate planning. Executors are those (there can be more than one) who will ensure the last wishes of the deceased individual in Ontario are carried out. It's a duty that requires both time and decision-making skills. It's important to ask an individual whether he or she would be willing to act as executor instead of simply naming the person in a will.

Do fiduciaries in Ontario have a say in end of life matters?

Making the decision to take a loved off life support is perhaps one of the most emotionally fraught decisions family members will ever have to make. Ontario residents on life support, without powers of attorney, living wills or fiduciaries could end up having the government make end-of-life decisions for them. Those decisions could come from the Consent and Capacity Board, which is an independent medical review panel mandated under Ontario's Health Care Consent Act. 

Naming an executor? Here are some important considerations.

Of all estate-related decisions, choosing an executor is one of the most important. If you choose the wrong person -- someone who turns out to be untrustworthy -- your life's savings could be squandered, and your loved ones could be badly hurt, emotionally and financially.

What are the common causes of estate litigation?

While for many people family is the most important thing in life, it can be difficult sometimes to idealize family dynamics. Every family is different, and when life is shaken by the loss of a loved one, sometimes family members experience bitter conflict for a number of reasons.

In the absence of a will, how are estate assets distributed in Ontario?

Creating a will is an essential part of estate planning, and not taking this basic step can prove extremely costly for the estate -- not only in terms of unnecessary loss of assets, but also in terms of heart-rending family conflict. Additionally, when a person dies intestate -- that is, without a will -- provincial laws determine who will be estate executor and how estate assets and debts will be distributed, and this manner of distribution is often not in the best interests of the family.

Don't leave your digital legacy to chance

It is an increasingly relevant issue in modern estate planning: how to distribute (or otherwise deal with) one's digital assets. And by "digital assets" we mean anything from pictures on your Facebook page to online investments and electronic banking.