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Estate Administration Archives

Making estate administration easier with a trust

Ontario residents who have a trust may already know that they need to fund it. Without addressing this important step, the trust may not be worth the paper it is written on when the time comes. One of the reasons many people use trusts is to help simplify the estate administration process, but that will not happen if they do not contain any assets.

Preparing for estate administration with proper planning

Ontario residents can spend a number of years working to build their wealth in order to enjoy retirement and provide for their families after death. After making years of good decisions to accomplish these goals, they would be remiss in failing to appropriately plan for estate administration. Creating a plan that allows surviving loved ones to move forward with as little complications as possible can rectify this problem.

Estate administration begins before a probate is filed

The death of a loved one can devastate an Ontario family. While many family members want time to process their grief, certain tasks need attention nearly right away. Many people believe that the work does not begin until the probate is filed, but the estate administration process actually begins much sooner.

A person's emotions could sabotage estate administration

Few people here in Ontario or elsewhere want to voluntarily sit and contemplate their own deaths. Even so, this is exactly what they have to do in order to build an estate plan. If emotions get in the way of taking this step, it could sabotage and unnecessarily complicate the estate administration process for surviving family members who must ultimately deal with the estates.

Is estate administration tax due on every Ontario estate?

It often feels as though there are several loose ends to tend to when an Ontario resident dies. If an individual left an estate plan, that should make the process go more smoothly. Those documents can also help determine whether and how much estate administration tax is due.

Blended families can encounter challenging estate administration

The definition of family has changed dramatically in recent decades. Many Ontario families have stepparents, stepchildren and half-siblings. When it comes to providing for them after death, residents often want to make sure that everyone receives their fair share. Without careful planning, blended families can easily encounter challenges when it comes to estate administration.

Helping the family find all assets during estate administration

When someone dies here in Ontario or elsewhere, surviving family members must gather all of the assets accumulated by the decedent that he or she owned at death. This includes large items such as a home down to small items such as jewelry, and everything in between that requires some attention during estate administration. What some people seem to miss is those assets that exist only online or on a computer.

Leaving the most assets available during estate administration

After spending your career building wealth, you may want to make sure that you can leave a legacy for your family members after you pass away. You can continue to build your financial portfolio with the help of an Ontario financial advisor. You may also want to make sure that most of the assets you own at your death go to your loved ones during the estate administration process.

Make estate administration easier by avoiding probate

Even if an Ontario resident's probate is not the longest one, it could take longer than surviving family members can afford or handle. To avoid this scenario, others may find it useful to structure their estate plans in such a way that estate administration is easier and takes less time. Taking steps to avoid probate can take the process in a direction that allows family members to access assets right away.

What to look for when starting estate administration

After the death of a loved one, certain matters will require settlement. Before any other steps in the estate administration process can be taken, all of the deceased individual's assets need to be located and protected. It is important to be as thorough as possible in this process in order to ensure that all matters are resolved at the same time in order to avoid any complications in the future.